Movies & Videos

We understand that not everyone likes to read, or even has the time.  As a committee we want to show you how important it is to feel that many of your grief experiences are shared by many people.  We also want you to feel cared for.  So make a tea, relax, and watch one of the below videos or big box movies.

Non-Mainstream Videos

  • A Cradle Song (1991), Canadian Learning Company.
  • Children Die Too (1990), Kinetic.
  • Encounters with Grief, Canadian Learning Company
  • How I Coped When My Mom Died, Canadian Learning Company
  • Inner View of Grief: Young Adults Dealing with Loss, Canadian Learning Company
  • Surviving Death: Stories of Grief (1986), Canadian Learning Company.
  • To Touch a Grieving Heart (1995), McIntyre Media.
  • What Do I Say To My Children (1989), Aquarius Productions.
  • Where’s Pete (1991), National Film Board of Canada.
  • ‘Saying Goodbye’ Series, TVO
  • The Pitch of Grief, Canadian Learning Company

Mainstream Movies

  • Beaches
    Hillary (Barbara Hershey) and CC (Bette Midler) meet as children vacationing in Atlantic City, N.J., and remain friends throughout the decades. As CC, a loud New Yorker, pursues a singing career, Hillary, a staid Californian, becomes a successful lawyer. Over the years, they often quarrel or compete, but, as other relationships flourish and die, the two women are always there for each other, traveling from coast to coast through the most tumultuous times. A remake of this movie was made in 2017 by the same title featuring Idina Menzel. An unexpected and lifelong friendship between an aspiring singer and the daughter of a prominent civil rights lawyer, after they serendipitously meet on Venice Beach. (1988) Buena Vista Pictures
  • City of Angels
    Seth is an angel who guides humans to the next life. When he sees Maggie, a heart surgeon trying to save a patient, he falls in love with her. Seth makes a choice which changes everything. Starring Nicholas Cage and Meg Ryan.  (1998) Warner Bros. Pictures
  • Collateral Beauty
    Howard Inlet, an advertising executive, becomes depressed post the tragic death of his young daughter Olivia. His business partners hire actors to prove his mental illness and take over his company. Starring Will Smith.(2016) Warner Brother Pictures
  • The Fisher King
    When provocation by Jack, a radio jockey, causes an unstable caller to shoot people, he becomes depressed. Soon, he meets a victim of the shootings and decides to help the man. Starring Jeff Bridges and Robin Williams. (1991) 
  • Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close
    Oskar (Thomas Horn), who lost his father (Tom Hanks) in the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center, is convinced that his dad left a final message for him somewhere in the city. Upon finding a mysterious key in his father’s closet, Oskar sets out in search of the lock it fits. Feeling disconnected from his grieving mother (Sandra Bullock) and driven by a tirelessly active mind, Oskar has a journey of discovery that takes him beyond his loss and leads to a greater understanding of the world. (2011) 
  • Flight From Death
    Flight from Death (2003) is a documentary film that investigates the relationship of human violence to fear of death, as related to subconscious influences. The film describes death anxiety as a possible root cause of many human behaviors on a psychological, spiritual, and cultural level. (2003) 
  • Ghost
    Sam Wheat (Patrick Swayze) is a banker, Molly Jensen (Demi Moore) is an artist, and the two are madly in love. However, when Sam is murdered by friend and corrupt business partner Carl Bruner (Tony Goldwyn) over a shady business deal, he is left to roam the earth as a powerless spirit. When he learns of Carl’s betrayal, Sam must seek the help of psychic Oda Mae Brown (Whoopi Goldberg) to set things right and protect Molly from Carl and his goons. (1990) 
  • Hanging Up
    Three sisters (Diane Keaton, Meg Ryan, Lisa Kudrow) do what they do best with life, love, and lunacy on the telephone lines that bind- when their father (Walter Matthau) is admitted to a Los Angeles Hospital. After years of wild living, intermittent affection, and constant phoning, he is finally threatening to die.(2000) 
  • Life is a House
    “Life as a House” is the poignant, often humorous journey of one man who decides to tear down his house — and winds up rebuilding the world around him. From the day he picks up his sledgehammer, George Monroe embarks on a grand adventure that will shatter expectations and build a foundation for many different dreams among his family and neighbours. (2001) 
  • Lilo and Stitch
    A tale of a young girl’s close encounter with the galaxy’s most wanted extraterrestrial. Lilo is a lonely Hawaiian girl who adopts a small ugly “dog,” whom she names Stitch. Stitch would be the perfect pet if he weren’t in reality a genetic experiment who has escaped from an alien planet and crash-landed on Earth. Through her love, faith and unwavering belief in ohana, the Hawaiian concept of family, Lilo helps unlock Stitch’s heart and gives him the ability to care for someone else. (2002) 
  • The Lion King
    This Disney animated feature follows the adventures of the young lion Simba (Jonathan Taylor Thomas), the heir of his father, Mufasa (James Earl Jones). Simba’s wicked uncle, Scar (Jeremy Irons), plots to usurp Mufasa’s throne by luring father and son into a stampede of wildebeests. But Simba escapes, and only Mufasa is killed. Simba returns as an adult (Matthew Broderick) to take back his homeland from Scar with the help of his friends Timon (Nathan Lane) and Pumbaa (Ernie Sabella). (1994) 
  • Lorenzo's Oil
    True-life drama of a father and mother who battled against the odds to save their son’s life. Augusto and Michaela Odone are dealt a cruel blow by fate: five-year-old Lorenzo is diagnosed with a rare and incurable disease, but the Odones’ persistence and faith leads to the cure which saves their boy and re-writes medical history. (1992) 
  • Man on the Moon
    Jim Carrey stars as the late Andy Kaufman, who was considered one of the most innovative, eccentric and enigmatic performers of his time. A master at manipulating audiences, Kaufman could generate belly laughs, stony silence, tears or brawls. Whether inviting the audience out for milk and cookies or challenging women to inter-gender wrestling matches, he specialized in creating performances so real that even his close friends were never sure where the truth lay. (1999) 
  • Men Don't Leave
    After her husband’s death, Beth Macauley (Jessica Lange) moves into an inexpensive Baltimore apartment with her two sons, Chris (Chris O’Donnell) and Matt (Charlie Korsmo). When Beth accepts a job at a local grocery store, Chris grows bitter and falls for an older woman (Joan Cusack), while 9-year-old Matt hides his grief behind a new interest in burglary. As the Macauleys adjust to their new life, they learn that sticking together is the only way to overcome their loss. (1990) 
  • Meet Joe Black
    Bill Parrish (Anthony Hopkins), businessman and devoted family man, is about to celebrate his 65th birthday. However, before he reaches that landmark, he is visited by Death (Brad Pitt), who has taken human form as Joe Black, a young man who recently died. Joe and Bill make a deal: Bill will be given a few extra days of his life, and Joe will spend the same time getting to know what it’s like to be human. It seems like a perfect arrangement, until Joe falls in love — with Bill’s daughter. (1998) 
  • Message in a Bottle
    During her morning jog on the beach, journalist Theresa Osborne (Robin Wright Penn) discovers a bottle protruding from the sand. Inside it, she finds a heartbreaking, anonymous love letter. After her paper publishes the letter, Osborne tracks down the letter’s reclusive author, world-weary widower Garret Blake (Kevin Costner), in the Carolinas. But, as Osborne finds herself falling hopelessly in love with Blake, she becomes wracked with guilt over the real impetus for her visit. (1999) 
  • Mother of Mine
    After his father dies in battle, Finnish youth Eero (Topi Majaniemi) learns that his mother, Kirsti (Marjaana Maijala), is packing him off to live with a Swedish foster family. As World War II escalates, Eero’s new home in the neutral nation is safe, but he struggles to bond with his guardian (Maria Lundqvist). He eventually returns home, but Eero never quite believes in his mother again. Decades later, an elderly Eero (Esko Salminen) learns details that put Kirsti’s decision into perspective (2005) 
  • My Life
    It seems that Bob Jones (Michael Keaton) has everything a man could want, namely a fulfilling job and a beautiful, pregnant wife, Gail (Nicole Kidman). But Bob’s life is turned upside-down when he is diagnosed with cancer and given four months to live — not even enough time to see his first child’s birth. To cleanse himself of demons in his remaining days, Bob makes a video diary, hoping to pass along some wisdom to his future child. Along the way, he discovers a lot about himself. (1993) 
  • My girl
    Tomboy Vada Sultenfuss (Anna Chlumsky) has good reason to be morbid: her mother died giving birth to her, and her father (Dan Aykroyd) operates a funeral service out of their home. The other kids think she’s a freak, and it certainly doesn’t help that her best friend, Thomas J. Sennett (Macaulay Culkin), is a boy. To make matters worse, Vada is desperately in love with her English teacher, Mr. Bixler (Griffin Dunne). What’s an 11-year-old girl to do? (1991) 
  • One True Thing
    Kate (Meryl Streep), the undervalued matriarch of the Gulden family, is diagnosed with cancer. Daughter and journalist Ellen (Renée Zellweger) returns from New York City to care for her mother at the request of her father (William Hurt). During the time Kate spends with her parents, she discovers secrets that she was never privy to in her childhood. Though Ellen has always idolized her father, she learns that her mother has had a much more difficult life than she knew. (1998) 
  • Ordinary People
    Tormented by guilt following the death of his older brother, Buck, in a sailing accident, alienated teenager Conrad Jarrett (Timothy Hutton) attempts suicide. Returning home following an extended stay in a psychiatric hospital, Conrad tries to deal with his mental anguish and also reconnect with his mother, Beth (Mary Tyler Moore), who has grown cold and angry, and his emotionally wounded father, Calvin (Donald Sutherland), with the help of his psychiatrist, Dr. Berger (Judd Hirsch). (1980) 
  • Patch Adams
    After struggling with depression in a mental hospital, Hunter “Patch” Adams (Robin Williams) decides he wants to become a doctor. He enrolls at Virginia Medical University but is disillusioned by the school’s clinical perspective on patient care. With the aid of a wealthy friend, Adams opens his own medical clinic for those without insurance. He forms a deep bond with fellow medical student Carin Fisher (Monica Potter) before a tragedy causes Adams to re-evaluate his approach. (1998) 
  • Ponette
    After losing her mother in a car accident that leaves her with a broken arm, 4-year-old Ponette (Victoire Thivisol) struggles with anguish and fear. Left by her father with a caring aunt (Claire Nebout) and her children, Ponette grieves, secretly hoping her mother will somehow come back. Confused by the religious explanations provided by adults, and challenged by the cruel taunts of a few children at school, little Ponette must make her way through her emotional turmoil. (1997) 
  • Rabbit Hole
    Eight months after the accidental death of their 4-year-old son, Howie (Aaron Eckhart) and Becca (Nicole Kidman) are trying to overcome their grief. He wants to hold on to everything that reminds him of Danny, while she would rather sell their home and make a fresh start. Cracks begin to appear in the relationship as Howie bonds with a member of his therapy group and Becca reaches out to a teenage boy with telling facial scars. Based on the play by David Lindsay-Abaire. (2010) 
  • Silver Linings Playbook
    After losing his job and wife, and spending time in a mental institution, Pat Solatano (Bradley Cooper) winds up living with his parents (Robert De Niro, Jacki Weaver). He wants to rebuild his life and reunite with his wife, but his parents would be happy if he just shared their obsession with the Philadelphia Eagles. Things get complicated when Pat meets Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence), who offers to help him reconnect with his wife, if he will do something very important for her in exchange. (2012) 
  • Stand By Me
    After learning that a stranger has been accidentally killed near their rural homes, four Oregon boys decide to go see the body. On the way, Gordie Lachance (Wil Wheaton), Vern Tessio (Jerry O’Connell), Chris Chambers (River Phoenix) and Teddy Duchamp (Corey Feldman) encounter a mean junk man and a marsh full of leeches, as they also learn more about one another and their very different home lives. Just a lark at first, the boys’ adventure evolves into a defining event in their lives. (1986) 
  • Shadowlands
    C. S. Lewis (Anthony Hopkins), the renowned author of “The Chronicles of Narnia” series, is a bachelor and Oxford University professor who spends his free time debating with fellow academics at a pub. Although he seems entirely uninterested in love, Lewis agrees to marry Joy Gresham (Debra Winger), an American writer who is looking to secure British citizenship. Their arrangement soon becomes a romance, and, when Joy is diagnosed with terminal cancer, their bond grows even stronger. (1993) 
  • Steel Magnolias
    M’Lynn (Sally Field) is the mother of bride-to-be Shelby Eatenton (Julia Roberts), and as friend Truvy Jones (Dolly Parton) fixes the women’s hair for the ceremony, they welcome a helping hand from aspiring beautician Annelle Dupuy Desoto (Daryl Hannah). Diabetic Shelby has a health scare, which is averted but doesn’t bode well for her hopes of having children. Time passes, and the women and their friends encounter tragedy and good fortune, growing stronger and closer in the process. (1989) 
  • Stepmom
    Three years after divorcing Jackie (Susan Sarandon), the mother of his children, Luke Harrison (Ed Harris) decides to take the next step with his significantly younger girlfriend, fashion photographer Isabel Kelly (Julia Roberts). But, when the flaky Kelly meets Harrison’s children for the first time, their fierce allegiance to their mother is obvious. Try as she might, Kelly fails to endear herself to her young charges — and to Jackie — until a looming family crisis changes everything. (1998) 
  • Sweet November
    Nelson Moss (Keanu Reeves) and Sara Deever (Charlize Theron) have nothing in common except an hour spent in DMV hell. Intrigued by each other, but not quite ready to commit, they settle on a rather unconventional courtship: a one-month trial, after which they’ll go their separate ways. No expectations. No pressure. No strings attached. What neither of them counts on is falling in love. (2001) 
  • The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby
    The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby is a set of three different movies written and directed by Ned Benson, each telling the story of a young couple and how they found and lost love. The cast includes Jessica Chastain, James McAvoy, Viola Davis, Isabelle Huppert, Ciarán Hinds, Bill Hader, and William Hurt. The films are subtitled HimHer, and Them, with the former two telling the story from the differing perspective of the husband and the wife, while the latter alternates the two POVs. Him and Her premiered to unanimous acclaim at the Toronto International Film Festival, while Them was created later, following the films’ acquisition by The Weinstein Company, and premiered to equal acclaim at the Cannes film festival. (2013) 
  • The Invisible Circus
    After learning that her sister, Faith (Cameron Diaz), has committed suicide in Portugal, Phoebe (Jordana Brewster), an 18-year-old hippie, decides to uproot from her San Francisco home to travel to Europe. Phoebe hopes to discover and experience the life that led to her sister’s death by retracing her footsteps, which eventually leads to Wolf (Christopher Eccleston) — Faith’s boyfriend. However, as Phoebe’s journey continues, a series of visions of Faith pushes her mind to the brink. (2001) 
  • The Fundamentals of Caring
    A writer (Paul Rudd) retires after a personal tragedy and becomes a disabled teen’s caregiver. When the two embark on an impromptu road trip, their ability to cope is tested as they start to understand the importance of hope and friendship. (2016) 
  • The Son's Room
    “The Son’s Room” follows an affluent Italian family through all the stages of grieving. When the teenage son dies in a diving accident, his parents and sister react with instinctive denial, followed by sorrow, anger, the disintegration of their own lives, the picking up of the pieces, and finally a form of acceptance. (2002) 
  • To Dance with the White Dog
    Shortly after celebrating 50 years of marriage, elderly farmer Sam Peek (Hume Cronyn) loses his wife, Cora (Jessica Tandy), to a heart attack. Though overwhelmed with grief, Sam stubbornly insists that he continue to tend to his orchards, refusing to entertain his family’s suggestions that he slow down. But when Sam cautiously reveals that he believes Cora has returned in the form of an elusive white dog, his adult children and grandson Bobby (Harley Cross) grow concerned about his sanity. (1993) 
  • The Descendants
    Native islander Matt King (George Clooney) lives with his family in Hawaii. Their world shatters when a tragic accident leaves his wife in a coma. Not only must Matt struggle with the stipulation in his wife’s will that she be allowed to die with dignity, but he also faces pressure from relatives to sell their family’s enormous land trust. Angry and terrified at the same time, Matt tries to be a good father to his young daughters, as they too try to cope with their mother’s possible death. (2011) 
  • The Single Man
    Mourning the loss of his partner Jim, George Falconer, an English professor working in Los Angeles, is finding life increasingly difficult to face. After being ignored by the family of his partner upon his death, George has now decided to end it all by committing suicide. While preparing for his departure, George encounters some of the people he has met during his time in Los Angeles and they notice a change in the man. (2010) 
  • To Gillian on her 37th Birthday
    WTwo years ago, David Lewis’ (Peter Gallagher) wife, Gillian (Michelle Pfeiffer), fell from their sailboat and died, and since then he’s been uninterested in other relationships. Rachel (Claire Danes), their daughter, has been suffering during this period, as David ignores her and goes walking on the nearby beach, where he communicates with Gillian’s ghost. Gillian’s sister, Esther (Kathy Baker), brings a friend to the house in hopes of sparking his interest, but that only leads to complications. (1996) 
  • Walk the Line
    The rise of country music legend Johnny Cash (Joaquin Phoenix) begins with his days as a boy growing up on the family farm, where he struggles under the scorn of his father (Robert Patrick). As the years pass, Cash ends up in Memphis, Tenn., with his wife, Vivian (Ginnifer Goodwin), and breaks into the music scene after finding his trademark sound. While on tour, Cash meets the love of his life, singer June Carter (Reese Witherspoon), but Cash’s volatile lifestyle threatens to keep them apart. (2005) 
  • Wit
    Professor Vivian Bearing (Emma Thompson), an expert on the work of 17th-century British poet John Donne, has spent her adult life contemplating religion and death as literary motifs. Diagnosed with advanced ovarian cancer, she consents to an aggressive and experimental form of chemotherapy administered by Dr. Kelekian (Christopher Lloyd) and his assistant, Dr. Posner (Jonathan M. Woodward), her former student. Facing death on a personal level, she reflects on her life and work. (2001) 
  • What Dreams May Come
    After Chris Nielsen (Robin Williams) dies in a car accident, he is guided through the afterlife by his spirit guide, Albert (Cuba Gooding Jr.). His new world is beautiful and can be whatever Chris imagines. Even his children are there. But, when his wife, Annie (Annabella Sciorra), commits suicide and is sent to hell, Chris ignores Albert’s warnings and journeys there to save her. Upon arrival, Chris finds that rescuing Annie will be more difficult than he’d imagined. (2005) 
  • Philomena
    In 1952, Irish teenager Philomena (Judi Dench) became pregnant out of wedlock and was sent to a convent. When her baby, Anthony, was a toddler, the nuns took Philomena’s child away from her and put him up for adoption in the United States. For the next 50 years, she searched tirelessly for her son. When former BBC correspondent Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan) learns of the story, he becomes her ally. They travel together to America to find Anthony and become unexpectedly close in the process. (2013) 
  • PS I Love You
    When Gerry (Gerard Butler), the husband of Holly Kennedy (Hilary Swank), dies from an illness, she loses the love of her life. Knowing how hard Holly will take his death, Gerry plans ahead. Beginning on her 30th birthday, she receives the first in a series of letters written by him, designed to ease her grief and encourage her to move forward to a new life. (2007) 
  • The Station Agent
    The life of train aficionado and downcast little person Finbar McBride (Peter Dinklage) takes an unexpected turn when his boss dies and wills him a railroad depot in New Jersey. He decides to relocate to the small town, where he befriends talkative food vendor Joe Oramas (Bobby Cannavale) and unhappy wife Olivia Harris (Patricia Clarkson). As the trio’s interactions deepen, quirky conversations and outcomes ensue. McBride also gains insight from librarian Emily. (2003) 
  • UP
    Carl Fredricksen, a 78-year-old balloon salesman, is about to fulfill a lifelong dream. Tying thousands of balloons to his house, he flies away to the South American wilderness. But curmudgeonly Carl’s worst nightmare comes true when he discovers a little boy named Russell is a stowaway aboard the balloon-powered house. A Pixar animation. (2009)